Service-Learning 2018-04-16T14:34:43+00:00

Abstracts

Service-Learning Presentations

Library Rooms 212, 213
Friday, April 20, 2018

Grambling State University

Library Room 212
9:45 am – 10:00 am
Implementation of a Multicultural Day Project- Celebration of Cultures
Nur-Hassan, Dr. Mary Ghongkedze – Assistant Professor

Multicultural education is truly transformative only when it includes a community service component whereby it acts as a catalyst for change. It is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful service with instruction and reflection to enrich the cultural learning experience of candidates, teach civic responsibility and strengthen communities.
Candidates present sample cultural experiences and practices to fellow candidates, faculty, students and other members of the university. The goal is to educate people in our community about beliefs and traditions of a variety of cultures in the United States. This gives an opportunity for candidates to share cultural experiences as a service to their community.


Library Room 212
10:00 am – 10:15 am
Using Movies and Games to Developing Leadership Skills
Prentiss Smiley, Dr. Ellen D. Smiley – Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Rory L. Bedford – Director of Continuing Education and Service-Learning

Members of the Honors College under the mentorship of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Director of Continuing Education and Service-Learning developed a week long summer program for middle school students to help develop leadership skills. The curriculum was based on John Maxwell’s books about leadership and other resources. Movies and select games were used to identify skill sets that create good leaders. The middle school students also shadowed a campus mentor for a day and had a reflection period with their respective mentor during lunch each day. At the end of the day the university students would evaluate the curriculum to make sure that goals were being met to maximize effectiveness of the program.


Library Room 212
10:15 am – 10:30 am
Documenting our Stories – Documenting our Lives
Catherine Bonner

Attempting to preserve the achievements, struggles, and memories of our ancestors, this literary-oral history project requires that each student interviews a senior member of his/her family or community. Students will ask at least 5 questions in these specific areas: home places, personal data, marriage and children, education, and work-totaling 25 questions. They will also ask at least 5 questions regarding family life in these specific areas: gatherings, storytelling and traditions, names and name changes, racial differences, the family bible, family documents, religious affiliation, family burials, military service, civil rights activities, and community activities-totaling 50 questions. The second component of the assignment requires students to write a two-page reflective essay describing their and the participants’ personal reactions to the experiences described in the interview. Data collected from these interviews will be used to profile Grambling State University’s cultural and ancestral history.


Library Room 213
10:15 am – 10:30 am
Isle of Beauty Restoration, Le’ve’ Dominica
Evelyn Jenkins, Cassandria Peoples – Assistant Professor

This is a macro level service project in which students learned and executed the planned change or social work helping process to improve the condition of the Dominica Island by focusing on meeting the needs of its individuals and families.

In September 2017, Hurricane Maria did massive destruction to the Dominica Island. Families were left homeless and without food, water, clothing, and other basic necessities. Farm crops, the livelihood for many, were destroyed. After hearing about the condition of the Island, students wanted to offer assistance. A presentation was made showing the island before and after the hurricane, fellow students from Dominica were engaged and interviewed to complete an assessment of needs based on reports from their families. Flyers and posters were developed indicating most critical items needed, and items were collected for shipment to the Island.

In addition to learning the steps of the planned change process and providing a service to the people of Dominica, this project allowed students to meet Dominicans and learn about their culture, as well as integrate the concept of globalization and a recognition of the need for social workers to have an international perspective.


Library Room 212
2:00 pm – 2:15 pm
Promoting awareness of Human Genetic Diseases to students
Hung-Tat Tony Leung

The purpose of this serving learning project is to promote the awareness of students on campus on the prevalence of genetic diseases around us. Each student is asked to research a human genetic disease and summarizes all the relevant information, including % of population affected, symptoms, treatments, updated genetic/medical research on the topic etc… Each student will design a leaflet that contains the information, including cartoons to stimulate interest. Each student is required to distribute the leaflets to 30 students on campus. Students could also send their leaflets to middle/high school teachers who agree to distribute the leaflets to their students. Each student prepares a log (with names, time and date) to document the distribution of the leaflets, or the name of the middle/high school and the teacher to whom the leaflets were sent.


Library Room 212
2:15 pm – 2:30 pm
The Elderly in our Community
Mary Ghongkedze

To better understand lifespan development practically, the class made a visit to Alpine Gamble Guest Care home in Ruston. As one of the class’s projects the visit provides the opportunity for students who are recreational therapist major to interact and appreciate the ageing in our community. We live in a world where youthfulness is worshiped, and the elderly are often ignored. The project helps students to explore and understand the prevalence of health and wellness for the elderly in the community. The visit is intended to boost their physical, socio- emotional, cognitive development through games, exercise, dancing, and socializing with them. One way to appreciate senior citizens, who for the most part, paved the way for what we do and have today, is to show affection, and value their contributions to society by visiting and listening to their awesome stories of achievements. Recognizing individual stories and capabilities allows the elderly to uphold their integrity, dignity, value, and respect in the society. Other times, the GSU students work in groups to identify a person in the community who is physically, socially, emotionally needy and unable to do or carry out activities of daily living effectively and they provide needed assistance.


Library Room 213
2:00 pm – 2:15 pm
Microteaching Health Topics at Grambling Lincoln Preparatory Academy, Middle School
Martin Ayim, Teia Smith, Lxandra Mason, Adrienne Williams, Rebekah McCarthy

Earning 20 Service learning hours is part and parcel of the HPR 320 Strategies for Teaching Coordinated School Health Program a course in the Health Promotion concentration of the BS Kinesiology degree Program. Majors micro teach a health topic as a requirement. Majors are supervised by a certified Health and Physical Education Teacher or the Principal. Supervisors sign a contract agreeing to supervise and evaluate the students voluntarily using a rubric. Majors choose their topics from a list of health promotion-related topics approved by the Principal. Majors then research, construct a lesson plan which is presented to faculty to edit and approve prior to their microteaching experience. The purpose of microteaching is to enhance the application of principles in a real life situation in a health education practice setting, offer service to students, and build their academic resumes. At least 30 majors micro teach each semester. Lincoln Prep students usually like the interaction. Majors also enjoy the exercise as seen with their one page written feedback. This service learning experience has helped students to secure employment.


Library Room 213
3:00 pm – 3:15 pm
Re-engineering the Operations Management of a Real Live Local Small Business
Augustine Dzathor

Grambling State University (G.S.U.) is the university where we aim to make “…everybody somebody” G.S.U. College of Business aspires to mold students into team-players; effective communicators; technically competent critical thinkers who function efficiently and effectively in a globalized business environment. G.S.U. has adopted service learning to leverage its curricula. Faculty are encouraged to build service learning projects into their courses.

In response to this call, I have built a service learning project into my Operations Management course. The goal is to expose students to challenges in the actual operations of an organization and to apply concepts in the real world of organizations.

Students are grouped into teams. Each team seeks approval to study a small business; identify an operational problem, investigate it and write a proposal to resolve the problem. Teams are required to submit a report to the instructor for grading and to copy the management of the firm under study for possible implementation. Teams also orally present their proposal in a seminar to which the management of the firm under study is invited to attend. The objective is to prepare the students better for industry. At Grambling, we believe the essence of education is not knowledge, but action!

Louisiana Tech University

Library Room 212
2:30 pm – 2:45 pm
Nursing Students use Service Learning to Increase HIV Awareness on a University Campus
Dewanna Blake, Sherrie Roberson

Objective: The learner will be able to describe methods of increasing awareness for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).
Significance: Louisiana has the second highest statistical ranking of HIV based on National Rankings from 2015. In 2016, Louisiana’s largest percentage of new HIV diagnoses were between the ages of 20-24 years old. A service learning project on HIV offers a unique opportunity for nursing students to disseminate knowledge and develop self-awareness in diverse community settings.

Methods: Nursing students participated in an HIV Awareness Project targeting a University Campus. Students designed poster presentations with education on HIV Awareness that included topics on transmission methods, prevention measures, myths, and facts. In addition, students provided HIV literature and resource contact information. Students participated in a reflection paper of the experience.

Results: Nursing students shared knowledge and awareness with 413 contacts on Louisiana Tech University campus. Reflections describe first-hand experience in witnessing the stigma associated with HIV. Student comments note the need to raise awareness on prevention measures for HIV and available resources.

Conclusion: Students reflected the need to continue HIV awareness in a University setting and recommended expanding the service to the Community. Student evaluations reflect the service learning experience as positive.


Library Room 212
2:45 pm – 3:00 pm
Encouraging social media strategies for cyber education company
Judith Roberts

In the winter quarter, COMM 440: Social Media, a senior-level course in Louisiana Tech’s department of communication and media studies, was offered for the first time. A service-learning project with Bossier City’s Cyber Innovation Center was the capstone project for the course. Students worked in teams to develop a social media campaign proposal for the nonprofit organization. Not only did the groups come up with objectives, strategies, and tactics, but they also composed a social media analysis of the CIC and a competitor analysis. The teams presented their results to CIC employees with varying and creative results. While each team worked with the same client, they all came up with differing opinions from how the CIC should brand itself online to what social media outlets should be used. CIC employees were encouraged to rank the teams, encouraging healthy competition between the classmates. A peer review at the end of the quarter indicated that students enjoyed being assigned into groups instead of choosing groups for themselves, working with a real client, and using their classroom knowledge in a hands-on project. The project was a success, giving the clients deliverables and creative content with sample graphics and a social media campaign and students an addition to their portfolio with a real-life project.


Library Room 213
2:15 pm – 2:30 pm
Parkinson’s Education for Tomorrow’s Nurses through Rock Steady Boxing
Tara Haskins, Dewanna Blake, MSN, RN, Sherrie Roberson, MSN, RN

Objective: The learner will be able to replicate the collaborative service learning strategies to enhance student learning objectives through Rock Steady Boxing.

Significance: Parkinson’s disease is the second most common movement disorder with over 60,000 people diagnosed yearly. Rock Steady Boxing is a community exercise program aiming to improve quality of life of people with Parkinson’s using non-contact boxing training techniques. The Louisiana Tech Rock Steady Boxing program completed a successful year of community recruitment and outreach and was featured in local media and Senior community events.

Methods: This service learning nursing activity incorporated Parkinson’s education and active collaborative learning with Rock Steady Boxing. The initiative was supported through an Innovative Instruction grant from Louisiana Tech University College of Applied and Natural Sciences. Following a Parkinson’s lecture, students completed Rock Steady Boxing training with orientation for volunteer expectations, boxer limitations and safety from the Rock Steady staff. Twenty-seven students became sparring partners for the boxers in an exercise session.

Results: Students observed Parkinson’s symptoms and recognized the importance of activity, exercise, camaraderie, and a hope-centered community. Rock Steady Boxers benefited from the student energy and their assistance with modifications and ambulation support. Students created social media videos for our Division Facebook page to raise awareness during Parkinson’s Awareness Month.

Conclusion: The Rock Steady Boxing service learning activity applied healthcare content to a community exercise program. Students expressed increased importance for safety and the need for community support. Student reflections, evaluations and creative social media videos revealed a positive learning experience.

McNeese State University

Library Room 212
8:30 am – 8:45 am
McNeese Music Education Students Provide “Excellence with a Personal Touch”
Jan Scott

W.A. and Dorothy Hanna Department of Performing Arts at McNeese State University integrated a service learning opportunity in partnership with the Maplewood Middle School band program 7 years ago. The mission of MSU is to provide “Excellence with a Personal Touch”. The Junior-level music education students assisted the director in providing that service by transforming the lives of the Beginning Band Student with this collaboration. This session will discuss the knowledge gained over the past seven years of collaboration.

Nicholls State University

Library Room 212
8:45 am – 9:00 am
Examining Client Cooperation as a Variable in Service Learning Outcomes
Nicki Boudreaux, Dr. Linda Martin

Service learning is used in public relations pedagogy to allow students to experience the strategic PR process in practice. Operating as a PR agency, students work for community-based clients creating and executing PR campaigns. Through case study, this research identifies potential learning outcomes with three typical client types: The “Enthusiast,” the “Win-Win” and the “Rogue.” Three service learning client cases were examined to determine if client type affected learning outcomes. The primary investigator is a mass communication faculty member at Nicholls State University with direct experience in advising students in each case. In an effort to improve the validity of findings, an experienced public relations strategist and senior faculty member examined the cases independently. The study findings revealed meaningful learning outcomes independent of the level of client cooperation. Outcomes include negotiating ambiguous client objectives, creating client-specific strategies for actual target audiences, executing effective tactics, managing ethical challenges, and expanding interpersonal, group and organizational communication skills.


Library Room 212
9:00 am – 9:15 am
Leveraging Community Partnerships: The Search for Data
Tina Granger, Jennifer Richard, Christina Salter, Anna Kitchen

Community partnerships are a vital source of internship positions, guest speakers, and financial capital, but are often overlooked as a data source. How to leverage a community partnership into a data collection source to enhance undergraduate research opportunities. Presentation and discussion of academic/community networking strategies and civic engagement activities that produced research focusing on Louisiana domestic violence homicide trends (2012-2015).

Key words: community partnerships, domestic violence, networking strategies, and civic engagement.


Library Room 212
9:15 am – 9:30 am
Nurturing Biophilia on Louisiana’s only inhabited barrier island: Grand Isle
Gary Lafleur, Jean Landry, Jeff Brown

In collaboration with The Nature Conservancy, Nicholls students from biology and art have created a yearly program to nurture biophilia in students living on the only inhabited barrier island of Louisiana, Grand Isle. The objective is to offer a hands-on introduction to barrier island ecology for students in grades 2 and 3. College students lead three teams of elementary school students on a hike that highlights three primary habitats of a barrier island: the sandy beach on the front, the calm cheniere forest in the middle, and the muddy marsh on the back. Each team has a turn at leading the expedition by bearing the flag, and being in charge of a bucket of ecological artifacts. While hiking, the college students learn the names of their team members, discuss career options, and answer questions about ecology. College art students lead an exercise in the creation of ethereal art with found objects from the hike. Once back in the classroom, college students lead a review of the different ecological elements of each of the three habitats. For instance, they compare and contrast how shore birds are found on the beach, while neotropical songbirds occur in the cheniere forest, with wading birds preferring the marsh. These types of examples emphasize that not all birds are the same, that organisms fit into distinct niches, and that one healthy island ecology depends on the conservation of several habitats. In addition, the college students gain permission to express their innate joy for ecological exploration.


Library Room 213
9:00 am – 9:15 am
Using Microsoft Excel to Develop a Simple Gas Lift Optimization Program
Ali Edreisi

Gas lift optimization has been automated in recent decades through the use of complex and expensive computer programs. However, many operators do not opt to pay the premium for such services and continue to make gas lift rate adjustments through trial and error. Through data acquisition and analysis, an operator can improve the efficiency of their gas lift system to ensure that the least amount of gas is injected for the most amount of oil output without the need for expensive software. This goal has been targeted in this study by developing a simple gas lift optimization program using Microsoft Excel. The program uses the measurement of existing well characteristics to provide an estimated output of well production for any given gas lift injection rate. The program uses several well-stablished methods such as Poettmann-Carpenter and Hagedorn-Brown for the multiphase fluid flow calculations. A BFPD rate is then determined from the GLR to IPR table for the provided well data. The calculator has been tested using actual field data. The results on wells with a BS&W of 50% or more, yield a margin of error of less than 2% when comparing estimated BOPD rates to that of physical well performance at the same gas lift injection rate. Results from the upper and lower limits of the injection rate tolerance, in relation to the well’s maximum/minimum performance capabilities showed a higher margin of error, with the most reliable results being obtained closest to the median of the IPR.

Southeastern Louisiana University

Library Room 213
8:30 am – 8:45 am
The Use of an Interactive Physical Activity Lab and Foods Lab Provide Experiential Education and Community Outreach for Children and Families Seeking Healthier Lifestyles
Callie Lambert, Dr. Holly Kihm, Raven Gooden, Jena Boudreaux

In Louisiana, 33% of adolescents and 28% of children are either overweight or obese, and most do not meet physical activity recommendations. Latest trends show a need for innovative interventions, creative motivational techniques, and real world assessment tools to be used while working with children who struggle with weight management. The objective of this session is to highlight some of our student’s achievements working with children and their families as they progress toward their healthy lifestyle goals.

During the year-long project, undergraduates worked with 20 children (5 hours per week) using different pieces of exercise equipment and exergaming, in an attempt to determine what exercises/motivational factors increased the children’s physical activity levels. Some of the motivational factors used were music, cycling videos, positive reinforcement, competition, and solo play. Data were collected using accelerometers, pedometers, and heart rate monitors.

Results of the project showed that the more awareness children had of their heart rate and heart rate zones, the more effort they put in to staying in the “aerobic” zones during physical activity. The children also responded well to pedometers, progressively increasing their activity over the year. Up-tempo music and friendly completion, especially with tangible rewards, also served as positive motivating influences.

Both parents and their children enjoyed the nutrition components of the projects. Children were able to sample and work with unfamiliar foods, and parents had the opportunity to try new recipes and learn the fundamentals of food as fuel. Throughout the year, undergraduates were able to hone their skills when working with both adults and children. The experience was both a positive for the community and students as they worked together to achieve their goals.


Library Room 213
8:45 am – 9:00 am
The Health Transition Alliance: A Campus -Community Partnership
Jessica Friley, Ralph Wood, Katie Jones, Kayla Noll

The Health Transitional Alliance (HTA) is a partnership between North Oaks Health System and Southeastern Louisiana University’s College of Nursing and Health Sciences. The HTA provides Health Coaching Internships for interested Health Education and Promotion and Kinesiology students to partner with medical staff and focus on reducing readmissions and improving disease management within the community These student health coaches work one on one to assist patients to better self-manage their chronic health conditions and reduce readmissions to the hospital. On average, student health coaches visit their patients one to two times a week with sessions lasting 60 to 90 minutes. Since the inception of the program in August 2014, over 70 students have completed this internship. Overall, student health coaches have reported that they have enjoyed and benefitted professionally from this internship. One student reflected, “I never expected to get so attached to my patient. Our bond is so strong and I am having a really hard time accepting the fact that my internship is coming to an end. I absolutely adore my patient. I genuinely care so much for her and want her to live the happiest life possible with the best quality of life. This internship has truly made me feel more confident about working in the medical field and I look forward to my future medical field career.” Our presentation will provide an overview this program and the student benefits of participating in this service learning activity/internship.

University of New Orleans

Library Room 213
9:15 am – 9:30 am
Documenting Life and Culture on Video
Laszlo Fulop

Associate Professor of Film Laszlo Fulop introduces undergraduate students to the fundamentals of documentary film production through his course. All elements of documentary filmmaking are covered: writing, producing, directing, and editing the documentary film. Students develop an understanding of the aesthetic dimensions of documentary film and learn the craft of documentary filmmaking through production assignments, critiques, and film analysis. Professor Fulop saw great opportunity for service learning in the production assignments. He teamed up with Vianolavie.com, a website about life and culture in New Orleans, which brings to the class a list of potential projects students could work on. Each student chooses a subject, such as an artist or a musician or a local non-profit organization, and produces a short video. These short documentaries are then posted on Vianolavie.com thus giving a high visibility to film students at UNO. The community partners receive a highly valuable marketing tool at no cost, and students get hands-on experience in film production.


Library Room 213
9:45 am – 10:00 am
Service Learning at UNO
Patrick Stewart

Service learning at the University of New Orleans is undergoing programmatic changes aimed at increasing the impact of the University in the community, broadening pathways to experiential learning for all students, and becoming a recognized leader in community engagement. In collaboration with the University Registrar, we have developed a simple system by which service learning and volunteer hours can be tracked and noted on student transcripts. Our new streamlined administrative process includes several points of contact with our community partners (i.e. our customers) to ensure clear, consistent communication and create a fertile landscape for future ventures and expanded partnerships. In short, improved processes and data tracking combined with greater customer service is our plan for promoting volunteerism and expanding and strengthening service learning programs at UNO.


Library Room 213
10:00 am – 10:15 am
Service Learning at UNO-Innsbruck International Summer School
Irene Ziegler

Irene Ziegler, Director of UNO-Innsbruck International Summer School program in Innsbruck, Austria, has incorporated some service learning opportunities for our students over the past few years. At first, it was difficult to find opportunities due to the language barrier and the relative wealth of the city of Innsbruck and its inhabitants, but eventually several opportunities presented themselves. Students have participated in projects supporting a local soup kitchen, flood relief efforts through the Red Cross, and a broad span of the population at several refugee centers. Feedback from student participants has been tremendous, and as such, we plan to continue offering service learning opportunities in Innsbruck for many summers to come.


Library Room 213
2:30 pm – 2:45 pm
Giving and Receiving: First-Gen Students Building Community
Lynette Bates

This session will explore practical and creative ways to design holistic service-learning opportunities which will enhance the development of the first-generation college student. Special emphasis will be placed upon providing experiential learning opportunities. Furthermore, soft and workplace skills as the foundation for building global citizenry will be highlighted.


Library Room 213
2:45 pm – 3:00 pm
Uptown Triangle: PPGIS lights up the Black Pearl in New Orleans, LA
Michelle Thompson, Graham Hayes

This UNO Public Participation Geographic Information Systems (PPGIS) research continued a study of quality of life indicators within the Black Pearl, a neighborhood located in Uptown New Orleans. In the spring of 2014 Graham Hayes completed a profile of his neighborhood which led to conducting a baseline study for the Uptown Triangle Neighborhood Association (UTNA). By summer 2014, Hayes was an Intern with Whodata@UNO PLUS PPGIS project, to evaluate quality-of-life QoL issues within the UTNA service area. These QoL indicators included street conditions, crime statistics, blight, and the proximity and frequency of each to functional or non-functional streetlights. Hayes conducted primary data collection and matched this with secondary public data sources. The location of poles was provided by the New Orleans Department of Public Works and confirmation of bulb type and wattage and the throw (distance of light coverage) of each bulb type. This data has been mapped to identify non-functional lights and their location, as well to identify any “dark spots” in the neighborhood. The “broken window” theory suggests that the condition of infrastructure and buildings has a direct impact on quality of life issues (Wilson & Kelling, 2007). This study has helped the UTNA and Municipal Leaders with ground truthing data and prioritizing the Community needs and concerns that were presented to municipal leaders. Initiating these improvements constitutes “extensions of crime-prevention through environmental design” resulting in “secure properties, enhancing the physical appearance of a neighborhood, and indicating the presence of caring, vigilant residents” (Roehl, 1998). Specifically, the installation and/or replacement of broken lights was one of the highest priorities. The presentation will describe the process of PPGIS project development and the results of the light mapping.

Back To Abstracts Home